Mrs Vivian

E-mail:vivian@cayuexin.com
Fax:86-0750-5617800
QQ:1927990170
Address:No.8 First Floor, #87 Yongxing new Street, Sijiu Town, Taishan City, Guangdong, China.

NEWS

Helmet User Guide
2015-10-8 14:25:51

· You always need a helmet wherever you ride. You can expect to crash in your next 4,500 miles of 

riding, or maybe much sooner than that!

· Even a low-speed fall on a bicycle path can scramble your brains. 

· Laws in 22 states and at least 192 localities require helmets. 

· Make sure your helmet fits to get all the protection you are paying for. A good fit means level on your 

head, touching all around, comfortably snug but not tight. The helmet should not move more than about 

an inch in any direction, and must not pull off no matter how hard you try. 

· Standards are no longer a big issue in the US market, but check inside for a CPSC sticker

· Pick white or a bright color for visibility to be sure that motorists and other cyclists can see you. 

·  Common sense tells you to avoid a helmet with snag points sticking out, a squared-off shell, inadequate vents, excessive vents, an extreme "aero" shape, dark colors, thin straps, 

complicated adjustments or a rigid visor that could snag in a fall. 

· Consumer Reports has some recommendations for brands

If you have six minutes, please read on! 

Six Minutes More

Your brain is probably worth reading this!

Need One? Yes!!

The average careful bike rider may still crash about every 4,500 miles. Head injuries cause 75% of our 

700 annual bicycle deaths. Medical research shows that bike helmets can prevent 48% to 85% of 

cyclists' head injuries. And helmets may be required by law in your area. 

How Does a Helmet Work?

A helmet reduces the peak energy of a sharp impact. This requires a layer of stiff foam to cushion the blow. 

Most bicycle helmets do this with crushable expanded polystyrene (EPS), the white picnic cooler foam. 

EPS works well, but when crushed it does not recover. A similar foam called expanded polypropylene (EPP) 

does recover, but is much less common. Another foam called EPU (expanded polyurethane) has a uniform 

cell structure and crushes without rebound, but is heavier than EPS and its manufacturing process is not 

environmentally friendly. Other foams are beginning to appear that may offer promise. The spongy foam pads 

inside a helmet are for comfort and fit, not for impact protection 

The helmet must stay on your head even when you hit more than once--usually a car first, and then the road, or perhaps several trees on a mountainside. So it needs a strong strap 

and buckle. The helmet should sit level on your head and cover as much as possible. Above all, with the strap 

fastened you should not be able to get the helmet off your head by any combination of pulling or twisting. If it 

comes off or slips enough to leave large areas of your head unprotected, adjust the straps again or try another 

helmet. Keep the strap comfortably snug when riding.

What Type do I Need?

Most bike helmets are made of EPS foam with a thin plastic shell. The shell helps the helmet skid easily on rough 

pavement to avoid jerking your neck. The shell also holds the foam together after the first impact. Some excellent 

helmets are made by molding foam in the shell rather than adding the shell later.

Beware of gimmicks. You want a smoothly rounded outer shell, with no sharp ribs or snag points. Excessive vents 

mean less foam contacting your head, which could concentrate force on one point. "Aero" helmets are not noticeably 

faster, and in a crash the "tail" could snag or knock the helmet aside. Skinny straps are less comfortable. Dark helmets 

are hard for motorists to see. Rigid visors can snag or shatter in a fall. Helmet standards do not address these problems--it's up to you!

Standards

A sticker inside the helmet tells what standard it meets. Helmets made for the U.S. must meet the US Consumer Product 

Safety Commission standard, so look for a CPSC sticker. ASTM's F1447 standard is identical. Snell's B-95 standard is tougher but seldom used.

Fit is not certified by any standard, so test that on your own head. Visors are not tested for shattering or snagging in a fall, 

so you are on your own there.

 

Comfort Requirements

Coolness, ventilation, fit and sweat control are the most critical comfort needs. Air flow over the head determines coolness, 

and larger front vents provide better air flow. Most current helmets have adequate cooling for most riders. Sweat control can 

require a brow pad or separate sweatband. A snug fit with no pressure points ensures comfort and correct position on the 

head when you crash. Weight is not an issue with today's helmets. 

Special Problems

Some head shapes require more fiddling with fitting pads and straps. Extra small heads may need thick fitting pads. Extra 

large heads require an XXL helmet. Ponytail ports can improve fit for those with long hair. Bald riders may want to avoid 

BACK